Posts Tagged ‘Books’

Make the Most of Your Commute

Saturday, September 6th, 2008
This is #6 out of 25 Tips to Become More Productive and Happy at Work.

Make the Most of Your Commute. How do you spend your commute? Make it positive time. Use it for reading, writing, creative thinking, creative projects, listen to audio books, or, heck, write your own book! If you enjoy your commute, that happiness will spill over into how you feel at work.

This is an idea that I can get REALLY excited about!  Because you know what I love doing during my commute?  Listening to podcasts!  There are podcasts for every subject and genre in which you could possibly be interested.  Audio books are pretty awesome, too.  They’re especially nice for longer commutes.

If you have never tried these two forms of media, you really, really should consider doing so.  You can listen to podcasts and audio books around the house, too, while you complete menial chores, and maybe you could even listen to them at work.

You’ll learn a lot and be entertained. : )

-MJ

PS – My favorite source of audiobooks is Audible.com.  And no, they’re not paying me to say this – I genuinely use and enjoy their books and service.  I wish they would pay me, though. That would be nice. ;)

Don’t Worry, Be Moderately Happy, Research Suggests

Thursday, April 17th, 2008

Could the pursuit of happiness go too far?  Most self-help books on the subject offer tips on how to maximize one’s bliss, but a new study suggests that moderate happiness may be preferable to full-fledged elation.

The researchers, from the University of Virginia, the University of Illinois and Michigan State University, looked at data from the World Values Survey, a large-scale analysis of economic, social, political and religious influences around the world. They also analyzed the behaviors and attitudes of 193 undergraduate students at Illinois.

Their findings challenge the common assumption that all measures of well-being go up as happiness increases. While many indicators of success and well-being do correspond to higher levels of happiness, the researchers report, those at the uppermost end of the happiness scale (people who report that they are 10s on a 10-point life satisfaction score) are in some measures worse off than their slightly less elated counterparts.

Click here for the full article.

Happiness Comes Cheap — Even For Millionaires

Thursday, April 17th, 2008

A bar of chocolate, a long soak in the bath, a snooze in the middle of the afternoon, a leisurely stroll in the park. These are the things that make us the most happy, according to new research from The University of Nottingham.

In a study commissioned by the National Lottery, Dr Richard Tunney of the University’s School of Psychology found that it’s the simple things in life that impact most positively on our sense of well being.

The study compared the ‘happiness levels’ of lottery jackpot winners with a control group, using a ‘Satisfaction with Life Scale’ developed by the University of Illinois. Respondents were asked how satisfied they were in relation to different elements of their life, their different mood states explored, how often they treated themselves and what form this took.

Surprisingly, it wasn’t the flashy cars and diamond jewellery that upped the jackpot winners’ happiness quotient. It was the listening to music, reading a book, or enjoying a bottle of wine with a takeaway that really made the difference.

Click here for the full article.

Are You Happy?

Thursday, April 3rd, 2008

Chances are if someone were to ask you, right now, if you were happy, you’d say you were.[1] Claiming that you’re happy—that is, to an interviewer who is asking you to rate your “life satisfaction” on a scale from zero to ten—appears to be nearly universal, as long as you’re not living in a war zone, on the street, or in extreme emotional or physical pain. The Maasai of Kenya, soccer moms of Scarsdale, the Amish, the Inughuit of Greenland, European businessmen—all report that they are happy. When happiness researcher Ed Diener, the past president of the International Society of Quality of Life Studies, synthesized 916 surveys of over a million people in forty-five countries, he found that, on average, people placed themselves at seven on the zero-to-ten scale.[2]

No doubt the conditions in which these 916 surveys were taken, and their methodologies and measures, were inconsistent. In some cases, respondents were approached face-to-face, at home. In others, they were interviewed by phone. Some conversations were mediated by translators, others by village elders. In some surveys, people were asked, “Generally speaking would you say you are very happy, fairly happy, not too happy?” In others they were asked how they’d rank, on a one-to-seven scale, the conditions of their life. In yet another they were asked to locate themselves on a ladder of self-satisfaction, where the bottom rung, zero, was “the worst possible life” and the top rung, ten, was “the best possible life.”

Click here for the full article and a list of books about happiness, including the book by Tal Ben-Shahar that inspired ButterBeeHappy.com.